Bodhi Mandala Summer Seminar on Buddhism, 2005

This is the second and final notice that Bodhi Manda Zen Center and the
Philosophy Department at
University of New Mexico are pleased to
announce that the 29th annual summer seminar on Buddhism will be held
this year from June 6 to June 17.

This year's featured scholars will be Janet Gyatso, Hershey Professor of
Religious Studies at the Harvard Divinity School, whose specialty is
Tibetan Buddhism; Charles Hallisey, Associate Professor of Asian
Cultures and Languages at the University of Wisconsin, whose speciality
is Theravada Buddhism and Buddhist ethics; and Karma Lekshe Tsomo,
Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at University of San Diego, who
is president of Sakyadhita, the International Association of Buddhist
Women. The principal focus of lectures the first week will be gender issues
and various ethical issues in historical and contemporary Buddhism. The
main focus the second week will be Buddhist practices on death and
dying. During both weeks there will also be lectures and workshops by
monks from the Rinzai-ji Zen organization.

It is possible to take the two-week seminar for academic credit,
conferred by UNM and transferable to most other colleges and
universities. By a special arrangement with the
University of New
Mexico
, no tuition fees are charged for this course. In fact, it costs
LESS to take this seminar for academic credit than it costs to attend as
a non-student. (A non-student is a participant who is not taking the
seminars for academic credit.)

Cost for a student for both weeks is $750
Cost for a student for one week only is $450
Cost for a non-student for both weeks is $900
Cost for a non-student for one week is $500

Bodhi Manda Zen Center is located in a canyon in the beautiful Jémez
Mountains
in central New Mexico. It is located about one hour's drive
northwest of Albuquerque Sunport. The meals are vegetarian. The rooms
are simple but comfortable. On the property there is a natural hot
spring where people can soak to their heart's content.

A typical day includes Zen meditation and chanting in the morning and
three class periods per day (two in the morning and one in the evening).
There are ample opportunities during mealtimes or unscheduled parts of
the day to chat with the lecturers and the Zen monks. The afternoons are
usually unscheduled so that attendees can hike, study, meditate, soak in
the
hot springs, walk through the charming village of Jemez Springs or
socialize.

For information on college credit, accommodations, or anything else
concerning the seminar program, please contact Rikk Murphy by
telephoning (505) 277-2405. Rikk can also be contacted by e-mail at
rikk@unm.edu.